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davismarkii
10-29-2012, 05:13 PM
Hello everyone. My name is Samuel Worsham.

My parents own a 1956 Mark II that I am going to be working on restoring. I am just working on getting the information I need to even get started on this, so being at the very beginning of this project, I am open ears to anything! It is number 3295.

I have always loved the lines of this car and the care taken into its production. I can't wait to get to know this car and all of you owners!

Talk to you soon.

-Sam

Sean Rollins
10-29-2012, 06:44 PM
Photos are always great help and we love em. Also, how much does the car need? The one thing it takes with a mark ll more than anything else is patience. They are not overly mechanic friendly, but more than worth the effort. Good luck.

Barry Wolk
10-29-2012, 06:59 PM
Welcome to the site. I note that you're an aircraft mechanic. You should fit right in.

davismarkii
10-29-2012, 10:22 PM
Here are some pictures I took yesterday while I was there. The vehicle is parked an hour and a half away right now. The car was driving when it was originally parked, so everything is there and running in theory. I am not wanting to just put in a battery and crank it over. haha. I am going to go ahead and assume that the best idea is to take the engine out and apart, check for rust and clean it, then put it all back together. Once again, mechanically, that's what I am initially intending. Cosmetically, I haven't really thought too much into it. I am more just into getting it rolling and running first.

Dan
10-29-2012, 11:33 PM
Welcome aboard.
You've found a great group of people to aid in this adventure.
The fact that this is your parents' car is cool.
Thanks for posting pics.
You will find that replacement mechanical parts are the easier things to find.
The fact that the car is intact means the hardest parts to replace are already in your possesion.
Good luck, and keep us posted!

Pat Marshall
10-30-2012, 06:49 AM
Thanks for the photos. I included a couple in your car's history in the Registry.

http://www.markiiforum.com/showthread.php?p=21627#post21627

Barry Wolk
10-30-2012, 12:56 PM
Unless you absolutely want to take the engine apart, have at it, but that's a huge waste of time and resources. Simply turn the engine by hand. If the valves haven't rusted to the seats there's no harm in starting it. If the valves are stuck, by all means take it apart.

The one thing you do't want to do is try and start it off the gas that's in it. Pull the access port in the trunk, remove the sending unit and look in the tank. If it's gross, pull it and clean it, along with the fuel lines. You'll have to pull the top of the carb to remove debris from the bowl. Fill it up with fuel and reinstall. This will give you just enough fuel to get it started. You can refuel from the vent holes until you get the fuel system up to snuff.

But, if you're like every aircraft mechanic I know, you'll have to take it apart. :)

linmk2
10-30-2012, 06:22 PM
Welcome! I was wondering if your parents were the original owners? If not, how long have they owned it? How many miles are on the car?

davismarkii
10-30-2012, 08:32 PM
Welcome! I was wondering if your parents were the original owners? If not, how long have they owned it? How many miles are on the car?

Thank you!

My parents are not the original owners. I think they are the fifth owners. They have owned it since the mid 80s apparently. The odometer is somewhere in the neighborhood of 697XX miles (it's hard to read with the pictures I took. I'll re-check when I am there again). Now if that is over or under 100000, I don't know, but I would guess under. Wishful thinking? haha

davismarkii
10-30-2012, 08:46 PM
Unless you absolutely want to take the engine apart, have at it, but that's a huge waste of time and resources. Simply turn the engine by hand. If the valves haven't rusted to the seats there's no harm in starting it. If the valves are stuck, by all means take it apart.

The one thing you do't want to do is try and start it off the gas that's in it. Pull the access port in the trunk, remove the sending unit and look in the tank. If it's gross, pull it and clean it, along with the fuel lines. You'll have to pull the top of the carb to remove debris from the bowl. Fill it up with fuel and reinstall. This will give you just enough fuel to get it started. You can refuel from the vent holes until you get the fuel system up to snuff.

But, if you're like every aircraft mechanic I know, you'll have to take it apart. :)

I totally agree with everything said! Ha! Taking it apart and checking everything probably wouldn't hurt just purely because it WAS stored outside for many years in the S.F. bay area (salty and humid air). I am terrified to pull the oil pan, as I am about 80% sure that no one prepped the engine or any other components for storage... so there is going to be any amazing amount of sludge in there. The tranny would be the next thing with a reseal and so on. From what I hear, the axles may have leather seals for the bearings? The engine will probably be the easiest part for me just because airplanes still use carburetors and magnetos, so that type of cleaning, assembly, and tuning are somewhat fresh in my mind. However, does anyone have an overhaul manual for this engine specifically?

I want to make this a 'frequently' driven car. Not everyday, but once or twice a week for sure (weather permitting). With how much dedication and money I am guessing this will take, anything less would be a waste and insult! :) With that being said, it would be a huge peace of mind to make sure there aren't impending failures internally that would allow it to break down on the highway just because I went the cheaper route. Atleast, that isn't one corner I would want to cut. :D

Barry Wolk
10-30-2012, 08:58 PM
I think you might be surprised at how easy it will start.

However, if you're bent on pulling the engine we can lead you to gasket kits, and the like. The only requirement is that you document every step of the way and post it here.

Modern axle seals are readily available. I don't think I've ever seen leather seals on a Mark II. They had them on my '33 Continental. I was able to find a modern replacement.

There is a fairly comprehensive service manual for the Mark II. However, any 368 engine manual will do. There is no difference between the Lincoln and Continental engines except their color, serial number, exhaust manifolds and valve covers. The rest of the parts are interchangeable.

Pat will be asking for the engine number for the car. It can be found under a thick layer of paint stamped into the engine block at the base of the distributor. You might as well look for a tag on the firewall. He likes that info, too.

davismarkii
10-30-2012, 09:07 PM
I am not sure the next time I will be down at the car, but next time I am, I will definitely get the engine number!

There are leather seals on their '37 Packard. I hadn't really given that part much thought, but a friend of mine said it could be possible. This rebuild looks like it might be a little easier than that one :P. Im not heart set on tearing it down, I just thought that might be a better way to do it.

Barry Wolk
10-30-2012, 09:14 PM
OK, I don't want to come off wrong, but if you have good compression and steady vacuum you really don't need to touch it. It's unlike an airplane that can fall out of the sky. Classic car insurance is dirt cheap as is some awesome road aid with 250-mile towing for next to nothing. I don't worry about breakdowns.

In fact, I bought a 1933 Continental Flyer a couple of years ago, did a compression check, changed fluids, replaced the rubber hoses and belts and drove it across Michigan. OK, it does't use brake fluid, so I didn't have to change that.

davismarkii
10-30-2012, 09:24 PM
HAHA, okay. :) I am new to rebuilding older cars like this. I have a few people, now adding this forum also, that are familiar with cars older than me, and almost all of them said the same exact thing you are! :) I like that route better, but it just scares me. They all say, "Just drive it until it breaks. If it ain't broke, don't fix it..." It makes sense to me, it's just hard for me to believe, that's all.

So just go down there, wash and clean everything. Check to see if it turns by hand, good compressions and vacuum. If it does, change sparkies, fluids, battery, and rubbers, and give her a whirl?

Continentalfan
10-31-2012, 01:33 AM
Welcome to the game you're in for a great time as you have the right attitude towards the car I brought #3077 out of your area to Canada two years ago and now it is a calendar car here and creating profile for MKII's in Canada. YOur car appears to have the 57 under-hood treatment with single light and paper filter air cleaner. Please let us know if that is the case (paper filter and not oil bath). Normally we find that on cars of higher serial number (starting at 3418 I believe). You have a project that is truly worthwhile..these MKII's are gorgeous when they are done up.

Barry Wolk
10-31-2012, 07:41 AM
HAHA, okay. :) I am new to rebuilding older cars like this. I have a few people, now adding this forum also, that are familiar with cars older than me, and almost all of them said the same exact thing you are! :) I like that route better, but it just scares me. They all say, "Just drive it until it breaks. If it ain't broke, don't fix it..." It makes sense to me, it's just hard for me to believe, that's all.

So just go down there, wash and clean everything. Check to see if it turns by hand, good compressions and vacuum. If it does, change sparkies, fluids, battery, and rubbers, and give her a whirl?

The only nod to modernism I've given my car is a Pertronix ignition and radial tires. I put about a thousand miles a year on my car and its never left me stranded.

They're right, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it", unless you're Mad Scientist. His was broke.