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Old 05-12-2010, 10:27 PM
depmike38 depmike38 is offline
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Default Brakes-Brake Line Cleaning

What would be a suggested way to clean out the brake lines on the Mark II(or anything else). Wheel cylinders & tredle vac can be rebuilt or replaced and hoses are available but I've never seen any good way shown to flush out the metal lines when the system is open so as not to push the residue through the wheel cylinders. I'm thinking about acetone as a cleaner but I don't know what to use to force it through the systems. Help guys.
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Old 05-12-2010, 11:26 PM
Pat Marshall Pat Marshall is online now
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From Trust My Mechanic.com

"To do this flush, we open the brake lines located at each wheel and allow the brake fluid from the brake master cylinder to "gravity bleed" as we continue to feed new fluid to the master cylinder until the fluid runs clear at all wheels. By gravity bleed I mean without the assistance of anything other than allowing the fluid to slowly drip from the lines by the natural force of gravity."
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Old 05-13-2010, 06:36 AM
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Barry Wolk Barry Wolk is offline
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I don't think that that answers his question. That works for a fluid change but doesn't address the flushing of debris. I believe that that can only be done under pressure.

I would fill the system with alcohol, not acetone, unless you were to isolate all of the rubber in the system. Acetone will eat the rubber and swell it at the same time.

Frankly, I would do a brake bleed with alcohol 2 or 3 times to remove any traces of old fluid, then pump in brake fluid to replace the alcohol. Repeated pressure flushings will get the debris out of the lines and cylinders.
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Old 05-13-2010, 07:23 AM
Pat Marshall Pat Marshall is online now
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I think the key part of what they are talking about is the "gravity feed". Meaning don't pump the breaks, to avoid forcing any bad stuff that's loosened up by the new brake fluid (or other solvent that might be used) into the brake cylinders.
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Old 05-13-2010, 07:33 AM
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Barry Wolk Barry Wolk is offline
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What good does that do if the debris is still there? Wasn't that the objective of flushing??

Seems very ineffectual to me.
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Old 05-13-2010, 07:43 AM
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OK - Here is a description of a process used by a $700 brake cleaning system. This names a solvent that is used.

"A method of cleaning and replenishing vehicle hydraulic brake systems is provided which includes opening all of the bleeder screws at the outlet end of the brake system and allowing the old brake fluid to flow from the brake system. Liquid solvent dichlorodifluromethane is then injected into the brake system under pressure at the master cylinder and allowed to flow through the system and out the bleeder screws. As the solvent enters the brake system, it wil mix with any remaining brake fluid and water in the system and, upon vaporization, will remove the remaining brake fluid and water from the system. When the solvent is observed flowing out of the bleeder screws, the solvent is shut off at the master cylinder and the bleeder screws are closed. A vacuum is then applied to the brake system at the master cylinder to vaporize and remove any solvent trapped in the system and to remove all air from the system. While the vacuum is maintained, new brake fluid is injected under pressure into the brake system through the master cylinder until the brake system is filled with new brake fluid. The connection to the master cylinder is then removed and the hydraulic brake system is closed."
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Old 05-13-2010, 08:41 AM
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Like I said, flushing does no good if there's no pressure to remove the debris.

Thanks for posting that.
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Old 05-13-2010, 12:00 PM
depmike38 depmike38 is offline
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My problem at the moment is that the tredle-vac is out of the car also. I don't have a pump to push it through in it's current state(and nothing to put a solvent in to allow it to gravity feed). What I was thinking of was a poor mans flush unit utilyzing an electric fuel pump to push it through the lines and then strain it into a container to catch any solids. Then I can use the used solvent a few times then chase it with some that's clean. I was afraid the acetone might be a bit rough on the seals in the pump so the alcohol would be good and easily obtainable or the commercial solution would be good.
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Old 05-13-2010, 12:53 PM
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I would discard the alcohol, or whatever fluid you use, after the first flush. Then I would use the next batch for subsequent flushes followed by clean fluid for the last flush.
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Old 05-16-2010, 11:27 PM
Don Henschel Don Henschel is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat Marshall View Post
OK - Here is a description of a process used by a $700 brake cleaning system. This names a solvent that is used.

"A method of cleaning and replenishing vehicle hydraulic brake systems is provided which includes opening all of the bleeder screws at the outlet end of the brake system and allowing the old brake fluid to flow from the brake system. Liquid solvent dichlorodifluromethane is then injected into the brake system under pressure at the master cylinder and allowed to flow through the system and out the bleeder screws. As the solvent enters the brake system, it wil mix with any remaining brake fluid and water in the system and, upon vaporization, will remove the remaining brake fluid and water from the system. When the solvent is observed flowing out of the bleeder screws, the solvent is shut off at the master cylinder and the bleeder screws are closed. A vacuum is then applied to the brake system at the master cylinder to vaporize and remove any solvent trapped in the system and to remove all air from the system. While the vacuum is maintained, new brake fluid is injected under pressure into the brake system through the master cylinder until the brake system is filled with new brake fluid. The connection to the master cylinder is then removed and the hydraulic brake system is closed."
Dichlorodifluromethane? Thats R-12 refrigerant. If you want to flush your lines and not worry about damaging your components, just remove the lines from the wheel cylinders, and master cylinder. Alchohol will work well and if you have to, blast it through with clean dry compressed air. And then Like Barry mentioned do a flush of new fluid If you have alot of rust and contamination coming out of the lines it probably is time for new wheel cyinders before they leak and soak your brake linings. $700 bucks for this so called flushing kit would more than pay for new brake parts.
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Last edited by Don Henschel; 05-16-2010 at 11:34 PM.
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