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Thread: Finally got my car. Now about those brakes...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
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    Wichita, Ks
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    Default Finally got my car. Now about those brakes...

    My car has been converted to a dual brake hydraulic system and a different booster, which may be a very good or a very bad thing. Can anyone identify what I have and/or does anyone have any experiences with same, good or bad? It has NOT been converted to disc brakes.56 Mark II brake booster and mcy.jpg
    Paul E Davis
    C56H3229

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    Bettendorf Iowa
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    Default

    It is not an aftermarket booster and master cylinder. It is a OEM unit of undetermined make to me. Can you take a picture from the other side and maybe with the cap off, please?
    Jay Hillsten
    C56F3099

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    El Cajon, CA
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    It's a standard Ford master from the early 70s. It is used for disc front drum rear. The larger rear chamber is for the front disc. I see no reason it won't work on drums. The only reason the chamber is larger is to provide more volume to the calipers.
    C56-91291,
    1952 Ford F-1 Pick-up,
    1962 Chevrolet Impala 427,
    1973 Harley-Davidson FL

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Bob Barger For This Useful Post:

    RODPARTS (09-28-2017)

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    Bettendorf Iowa
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    Drum brake master cylinders usually have a 10 lb. residual valve built into them. A master cylinder from a disc front/drum rear car has the residual valve for the drums built into the combination valve (the brass valve you see on production cars - it is a combination metering and proportioning valve with a low level light switch built in) It may be just the angle of the picture, but your master cylinder looks to have a brake light switch installed off of one of the master cylinder ports? Also make sure your brake line is not close to the exhaust - if it is, the fluid can heat up and boil with a loss of braking ability. Can you take closer pictures of the master cylinder? For disc front/drum rear, we use a 1" bore master cylinder and a 1 1/8" bore for disc/disc applications. A drum/drum setup could use a 7/8" bore master cylinder For more pressure.
    Jay Hillsten
    C56F3099

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