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Thread: oil in radiator

  1. #1
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    Default oil in radiator

    Has anyone had a problem with oil in the cooling water? I am wondering if there is a inherent problem with our engines for this problem, or possibly could it be a head gasket or water jacket problem. Before tearing down the engine I am reaching out for your experience on this problem. I did look in the advance search area but did not come up with anything. Thanks Cuz Vinnie
    Vincent Cashin
    C56C2571

  2. #2
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    No inherent problem. Has your radiator been replaced with one with an internal transmission cooler?
    Barry Wolk
    Farmington Hills, MI

    C5681126

  3. #3
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    As a general rule, oil in the radiator means a head gasket. If the engine has been severely overheated it could be a cracked head. I have, in the past, pulled the sparkplugs and used a pump made for the purpose to pressurize the radiator for a couple of hours, then cranked the engine over. If it's a headgasket coolant should be blown out of 1 or more plug holes. It is one way to prove the source of the problem.
    C56-91291,
    1952 Ford F-1 Pick-up,
    1962 Chevrolet Impala 427,
    1973 Harley-Davidson FL

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  5. #4
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    no transmission cooler in radiator, it is brown oil. crankcase oil.
    Vincent Cashin
    C56C2571

  6. #5
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    the strange part is that there is no water in the oil.
    Vincent Cashin
    C56C2571

  7. #6
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    Could it be old style radiator stop leak? Some of the stuff back in the late 70's was tar based (cheap and bad also) and it could be breaking down. That would explain the no water in the oil.
    Joseph Stebbins


    c56j3340

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  9. #7
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    The oil pressure is higher than the water pressure. Logically, you will find oil in the water but not the opposite.
    Roger

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  11. #8
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    Oil in the radiator is a head gasket on the water side of the head gasket, BUT, the next step will be when the compression side of the head gasket goes. At that point you will get water in the oil, which will turn your oil a milky color. BUT, the water in the oil is not a problem if you catch it fast enough, as just some water in you oil will not ruin your bearings and crank. BUT, if you have a 50/50 mix of water and anti freeze, the chemicals in the anti freeze will take out the bearings on the crank.
    I have rebuilt MANY diesel engines with this problem. The piston liner gives out and coolant gets in the oil, and wham $20,000 rebuild, Cat, Cumming, or Detroit, it does not mater what brand.
    There is a fix we use, that does work. It is called "Dyke". I don't know where you can get it, but we have used that on minor piston liner leaks and it works fine. Remember the compression is way higher on a diesel, so it will work fine on a gas engine.
    P.S. It will not harm water pumps or anything that you think it would!
    Last edited by lincoln mark; 04-01-2017 at 08:18 AM.
    Mark A Maromonte

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  13. #9
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    Mark,

    Can you give a little more information on "Dyke" and how you use it? I have never heard of it and it sounds interesting. I have used Bar Leak for temporary fixes to small radiator leaks but it sounds like you are talking about sealing small holes in the liner itself, Is my interpretation correct?

    The Rolls Royce engines that I work on have wet liners; cast iron liners in an aluminum block. The liners rarely get damaged unless a piston fails. More commonly, the O-rings/seals that isolate the liners from the water jacket (and oil sump) start leaking. They put weep holes in the block so you can see when a seal or seals start to leak and which cylinder is leaking.

    Larry
    Larry Durocher
    1956 Mark II C5601429
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  15. #10
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    Yes, I think I have a bottle or two in the shop. I will take pictures of the bottle, maybe you can track down a supplier around you. It is a green slim, very thick. Get a gallon jug, pour Dyke in jug, keep rinsing out Dyke bottle with hot water, and pour that into the jug. After you get Dyke bottle cleaned out, add a little more hot water to your jug, add the shaken mix to you radiator and go for about a 30 min ride. One bottle should be enough for a car. I put 6 BOTTLES, in a big cam 400 Cummings, took the truck out for about 45 min, and it stopped all the water going into the oil. There have been times I had to do it twice for a real bad liner leak on a truck, but always worked the first time on a gas engine. Please note, there are no pellets or whatever is in bars leak to clog or screw something up.
    One more story. On my old girl, a 1998 BMW 740il, I bought new and can not seem to part with, [I just repainted lol] I had a heater core leak. It was either take the dash apart and half of the car to replace the heater core or use Dyke. I used Dyke, and it did not harm or clog the heater control valve which cost over $300. A very complicated valve, many wires and hoses.
    Mark A Maromonte

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    rickswrecks (04-02-2017)

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